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Student Reactions

Reaction to another student  comments Question about student comments?
I agree with most of the students because this issue is a humanitarian issue before it’s an issue of race. Black people are humans and they should be respected and appreciated like all other people. Noone choose his color or his race. black people should be treated like other people. All the people should be treated like the teeth of a comb. No difference between white and black. Whoever did a crime should get the punishment no matter what’s his colour. No everything is clear
One of the student’s said that “I feel that law is being understood in the Black Lives Matter movement as an unjust or unfair way to keep people from color progressing or even living in peace” I understand that this person believes that people of color are being held back from progressing, one of the examples is that people of color have a harder time to get into political positions opposed to the white people. Another student said “People of color worked for little to nothing, under slave like conditions to find any way to make ends meet.” This student believes that people of color were getting paid much less than the white people. Another student said “Not to riot of destroy someone’s property was and is a common law. This relates to the commentaries because the commentaries talked about the common law.” This student is talking about the commentaries by William Blackstone and the Judiciary Act. Another student said “Racism and racial injustice actually should have been ended and now we are demanding it to end.” This student believes that there shouldn’t be any Black Lives Matter protests if the racial injustice has been ended long time ago, which it has not. Another student said “No one is above the law and there is no reason that a police officer should be able to get away with the things that they can. ” This student believes that no one is above the law, and I totally agree with them. Another student said “The Judiciary Act was a good starting point for a new nation, but over 200 years later it doesn’t hold up as well in our society.” This student believes that something within our judicial system needs to be changed. As a person that has a goal of becoming NYPD officer, I understand and agree that police officer should have better training in how to react in certain situations, and not always shoot to kill. How and what do you believe is the best way to end racial injustice? If the racial injustice did not end for so long, do you believe it will end right away or will it take sometime? Which part of training do police officers should be more focused on more, physical or the mental part of the training? Do you believe that people in higher positions such as politicians still manage to escape the consequences when breaking the law? 
In almost all of the comments, I have come to understand that the words oppression and supremacy are constantly repeated. I am still amazed about how when people are asked to view the BLM movement from a legal perspective, everybody feels that the movement is justified. But in all extent, there is no one who views it that way in the systems that govern the people. Everybody seems to relate to William Blackstone’s commentaries about how the movement is justified but I did not find a reason why the movement is not justified, and if so, why there is no person in power, or people in power that are actually doing something about it, apart from publicly speaking about it or acknowledging it. Why has there been no action to address the issues raised by the BLM movement, if the movement is justified?

Is it possible that the movement is still active after all those years and outcries due to ignorance of the American Legal System?

Why is that an idea has to be expressed in the most extreme way for change to occur?

Racism is worldwide. Why is it that it is mostly outspoken in the US while it is still going on in Asian countries and Europe?

Reaction on Students’ comments.

J.H.M.

I totally agree with J.H.M. because, for the people of the United States to follow or believe in the legal system, the government must provide a framework to the people that enforce the law. Such as policemen, and/or people in congress, etc. In my opinion, JHM wants to explain that the government should control law enforcement agencies or individuals who exceed their powers. For example, individuals who have exceeded their authority must be publicly punished in order to show society that law enforcement protects the people and not property. The state should limit power, such as was given to the police. Gov’t must consider changing several laws to become a policeman, there must be done certain reconstruction of the system, such as an individual who wants to wok in police must have a bachelor’s degree, must take undergo psychological tests annually, and the testing for this position should be horrified to such a level that individuals who have racist views will not have the opportunity to become police officers and enforce the law.

M.N.

MN had a very important point in his/her view that the proper training must occur for the officers for the nation to see that all people in the country are matter more than property. However, the changes must be done publicly shown to its citizens. It must be done publicly to avoid the chaos that it was reflected in Blackstone paper. Because the law was amplified by racist policemen ( Derek Chauvine from Minneopolice police)BLM saw such laws as unjust and biased, therefore aggressive reactions such as Rubery, braking small businesses and etc. accrued from BLM side. Two sides must work and changing the system by listening to other sides and start changing not the law but people who enforce the law. it must be done peacefully.

K.P.

Everybody each and every one of us regardless of race and where we came from is biased. It’s in humans and animal nature. It is in our consciousness. The problem arises when we start thinking these thoughts into actions and speech. We all often think very bad illegal thoughts but our conscious controls our actions. Some just let it go and therefore are called racist. It also comes from upbringing. The teen from the project has a different view on life than the teen from a happy big house owning parents. Some cops take the oath as a life commitment others just a way to get that get power over others. So we can’t judge a book by its cover. Slavery is a part of US history but it is the matter that we learn from it. You can not erase what happened in the past but why nowadays generations have to pay a price for their ancestors owning slaves.

I.J.

Police don’t have to use lethal force to prevent more damages. They have to use lethal force to contain and save the lives of people. Police can not lethal force to prevent damages that is wrong. Police must reduce situations from damages. They in ideal situations police do not protect property they protect lives. On other hand, how individuals can protest against violence if they protest caused violence and chaos with the intend. I do believe in protests they made ginormous changes to our legal system and laws in general for, for example, Martin Luther King. Such protest was not violent it was more caring about your idea and gather large support groups to march but never ever make businesses and innocent people suffer.

A.M.

Have you ever thought why in certain places people pay higher taxes? Because these taxes go toward people who live in these places. Better roads, faster contractions, better services, better school, better transportation, better sanitation, and street-cleaning. For example, we had a big pothole on an exit it was fixed within 24 horse, why? Because people pay high taxes which goes toward the department of transportation. They provide better and faster services. The government has to tax people equally based on their income, so, therefore, it will be valuable and important. It is all about a check and balances. For example, we cannot treat a five-star hotel in the same way we look at a one-star hotel. If the big boos lose the business hundreds of employees will lose their jobs and that exactly what is happening in this country. Therefore, hundreds of people are unemployed they receive their unemployment benefits that come from our taxes. Homeless people rely on food, on wheels, and shelters that are financed by our taxes. Methadone clinics for drug addicts are financed by our taxes. So, if you are going to lower taxes, it will backfire you with higher health care cost higher rates of transportations, more homeless people. Of course, their fundamental things like our freedom and opportunities but there are the things that need to be taken with equality in order to maintain our country.

1.Why would you think that government must lower the taxes unequally?

2.Why would you think that BLM position of acting aggressively is a correct position in order to change the legal system?

3. Why do you think the legal system and racial system is the same thing?

4. What must be done by the government to avoid racism among force implement institutions?

5. How can be BLM and the government needs to work together in order for people not to think that property is not more important than humanity?

Comments to MY: I don’t know whether the counter movement wants to continue the status quo or not, but I think without movements for justice there won’t be any political change. Also, I agree with that white people do not want to be judged by those who are not white, and most of them don’t want to see their real face.

Comments to AM: I agree with your ideas because I believe that all people are born equally and should be treated equally. Of course, everyone deserves to be treated fairly and I think we can achieve this kind of understanding by social movements and legal changes.

Comments to MN: I agree with that people cannot follow laws that they don’t understand and yes, they need simplified law to bring structure to a society. Also, even if the Judiciary Act was a good starting point for a new nation, it cannot stand still for a very long time. Because time, society, values and concepts are changing.

Comments to MC: Unfortunately, there always been violence and brutality among people. Sometimes police using abuse of power, sometimes citizens violate the law. That’s why people should obey the law, so they won’t harm the society.

Comments to RC: I strongly agree with you that BLM pointed out the flaws within common law. I think it’s a big achievement not only for BLM but also for all humanity. This is a big breakthrough in our legal system.

Question to MY: How specifically should change the current system?

Question to AM: By saying great, in your opinion, what specific characteristics should a leader have and what makes him great?

Question to MN: What exactly should change in our judicial system to be real change?

Question to MC: How can we make people obey the law?

Question to RC: What do you think, have BLM achieved their goals and what are their specific goals?

Reply to AM : I agree with you, that human life should be, without any exceptions be more valued over property. People especially of color or poor have been treated poorly for a long time now and it is simply unfair. I be also agree that it starts with our government leaders. They are our voice and they need to help with our needs.

Reply to SK : I agree with you, that protesting is the only way to try to get our voice heard and message across. Black Lives Matter was created just for that reason and we are giving everything we have. I also agree that this will continue if an end doesn’t come soon.

Reply to MB : I agree with you partially, that progress has been made, but not enough progress. We are still fighting for basic things. Black Lives Matter is the most recent protest to end social injustice and racism and still only little process is being made.

Reply to JHM : I agree, there have been many deaths and arrest during this Black Lives Matter movement. I also agree that police are getting away with their crimes towards the black and poor community. They try to make the officers action just and none of the stories are ending in arrest of the officers committing these crimes.

Reply to MN : I agree that no real change is happening and too much time is being invested into violence instead of reforming the country. The Black Lives Matter Movement has made people come to see the corrupt officers who victimize black and poor people and our messed up justice system for what they really are.

None
The one comment that stood out to me was MN. I felt like it stood out to me because I want to become part of the NYPD but as I see how everything is becoming it makes me not want to be as eager to join the NYPD as I was before.  MN had some really good points that I would like to emphasize, for example, real change needs to occur within our judicial systems ability to interpret and uphold those laws. I totally agree with him on that. To move forward in society, we need to work better on the way we can interpretant and uphold new laws so we can all be on the same page. At the end of the day what we really want is equality for all and after reading everyone’s comment it’s clear to say that we are far from it. The BLM Was the spark we needed for us to realize that no matter how long it been since jim crow been abolished or the abolishment of slaves things really haven’t been so much great for a person of color. As a Nation who calls themself the land of the free, it doesn’t much feel like that for the people of color. They go through hardships every day and it’s hard enough being a person of color in this country to let alone trying to chase the American dream when you feel all the odds are against you. KA mentioned that I don’t see any justification of the burning down of cities, small-time businesses, or the act of violence upon innocent civilians.” I totally agree with that statement because destroying other people isn’t helping anyone. You can’t destroy other people’s dreams to build your own dreams/goals. what I mean by that I know they just want to get their point across but destroying other people stores in the same community as you are it isn’t going to speed the process. AM and SK have different types of views. Am says we should understand everyone shouldn’t be treated fairly and I can’t say I agree with him at all. SK talks about how we need to protest and change the system so it can be fair for all. As a nation we have to do what’s best for us we can’t just say because my life is bad everyone else has to be terrible as well. We have to figure a middle ground to help support people of color to even the playing field. To end off JM explains it well how slavery and many other obstacles put by a white man cant, not co-exist in today America. What can we do as a society to help Improve relations between people of color and law enforcement.
I would like to add to AM comments However society has taught us that life is difficult, that struggling is the norm. Society want us to believe that the safest place is behind a wall. In this environment, optimism seems foolish and unrealistic. Yet, when we meet people who are truly optimistic, we are jealous of their cheerfulness. Attitudes of pessimism, skepticism and cynicism come from fear and distrust. Life can take care of itself, that’s the attitude of optimism. Do you see any changes 10 years from now? And who do you  think is going to bring the changes the President or the  Society?
NS-I understand everything you’re saying and you have a strong argument. However, your connection between the Judiciary act and the BLM movement is very broad. If you connect these two more directly your argument will be even stronger and easier to understand.

GA-Everything that you are saying here makes complete sense. Although I don’t necessarily agree with everything you said, your point is very powerful and really made me reevaluate my own viewpoints. A good way to make this paragraph even more impactful would be to use more examples of how the police are protecting and justifying racism.

IS-I agree with every word of your response and it is very thought out and well said. With that being said, what you are suggesting here is a lot easier said then done. What can these congressmen do in order to fix our broken system.

FC-The points you are making imply that all of these efforts to end racism were failures which in some sense is true. A really good way to strengthen this point would be to give examples of things that happened despite the efforts made by the government.

MB-You’re response has a lot of really strong view points an ideas. However, elaborating on those ideas would make this paragraph much more coherent and impactful.

-What led to people having the viewpoints that they have? Is it all their own ideas based on personal experience?

-A lot of people spoke about how our criminal justice system is broken, is it fixable and if so what can we do as active members of a community?

-Are Blackstone’s Commentaries and the Judiciary Act a good starting point for us to rebuild a new effective policing system?

motivation , outspoken , uplifting what is BLM’s view of justice ?
SK Comment :

I agree with SK comment about moving away from a system of racial injustice to just system  in where everyone is treated equally. However there is still need to addressed property damage cause by protesters. I believe the best way to counter this talking point is to talk about the damages this current system causes.

JM Comment :

JM comment compelling to me because JM addressed many laws that were put in place to stope people of color from gaining power. These laws are mostly background information that were abolish long time ago. I believe  the best way to addressed is to talk about the effects of those laws in our society.

MB Comment:

I am with MB comment because MB described  how black people fight for justice

and demand equal presentation in our government and law. I can see how the Blackstone inspired the black movement.

NS Comment :

I disagree with NS comment because the black live movement dose not promote destroying public property, moreover the black live matters can’t be held libel for the action of some individuals. Throughout not just us history but world history change comes with some consequences.

DF Comment :

  I  like DF Comment because he addressed the problems faced in the past and the effects of those laws still exists. Also the solutions that can stopped those injustice laws toward people of color. His solution is involved young people to vote for a better system that can provides  people justice.

AM comment

I don’t understand  what he trying to say or lead .

At 2:28, I agree with this students notion about human lives being more important than property and material things. This is something that our justice system sometimes fails to see, and a huge part of what the BLM protests are about. I think all of us grasped the concept and were able to relate Blackstones commentaries to our system today and the events that we’re currently living in.
the first question that was asked, “do laws actually work”. I was reading it and immediately i answered no. then I continued to think “damn these laws and this justice system was never meant to protect us, therefore it wasn’t meant to work for us.” none
Reaction to the comments of MB- I do agree that Black people have made a lot of progress in different fields but more remains unchanged. The share of African Americans living in poverty has declined substantially, today they are much better educated, material standards have in many ways improved, but many areas never saw much progress, or what progress was made has been halted or even reversed. Americans are determined to believe in black progress but it’s kind of a myth that the government tries to make people believe with the laws that were created to state that “we have equality because we have laws.” Facts show different results. Current gaps in every significant domain of social well-being (jobs, politics, education, health, housing, and of course criminal justice) are the facts that show the difference.

Reaction to the comments of AM- No questions that humanity is more important than money but unfortunately our systems of power value capital over human lives. Too many people in black communities have been killed by taxpayer-funded law enforcement officers. Even more have been harmed physically and psychologically by the over-militarized, over-funded police and sheriff departments. The U.S. tax system, once viewed as a model for sharing the nation’s bounty, is today a new engine of inequality. We should call on elected officials to not prioritize property over human life. Our focus needs to be on human life that is lost without recourse to justice. Every person should be treated equally before the law. It’s central to our country’s values and the rule of law.

Reaction to the comments of SK- To understand today’s protests, we must look further back. The conflicts of today aren’t just a repeat of past troubles, they’re a new development in the American fight for racial equality. The roots of protests go far deeper into the last hundred years of American history, which were punctuated by race riots, massacres, and clashes between the police/legal system of America, and African Americans. I agree with SK that the pattern will continue until systematic racism is rooted out. Racism is still present in our society and history repeats in a different way. Racial injustice reminds black people of their history and they don’t want it to repeat. White supremacy has created the conditions black people are protesting now. It puts black people at risk of losing everything their parents, grandparents, and their grandparents fought to win. Black people built this country – that is an indisputable fact. They have always been central to upholding American ideals, to defeating hate violence, from chattel slavery to the Confederacy to Jim Crow.

Reaction to the comments of JM- Despite African American workers have increased access to jobs and getting more jobs, labor market outcomes—including higher unemployment and fewer good jobs—continue to be worse for African American workers and their families. These differences are not new, and the longest labor market expansion on record has not eliminated them. African Americans have always been more vulnerable in the labor market. They regularly experience higher unemployment rates and work in worse jobs, which feature lower pay and fewer benefits, than whites.  American lawmakers have long sought to secure land for, reduce barriers to, and expand the wealth-building capacity of property ownership and affordable rental housing. But these efforts have almost exclusively benefited white households often, they have removed people of color from their homes, denied them access to wealth-building opportunities, and relocated them to isolated communities. Across the country, historic and ongoing displacement, exclusion, and segregation continue to prevent people of color from obtaining and retaining their own homes and accessing safe, affordable housing. Racial segregation in public education has been illegal for 65 years in the United States. Yet American public schools remain largely separate and unequal with profound consequences for students, especially for blacks. Let’s not forget that the Supreme Court declared racial segregation in schools to be unconstitutional in the landmark 1954 ruling Brown v. Board of Education. Perhaps less well known is the extent to which American schools are still segregated. All these experiences have historically been worse than that for whites, and this continues today. Many laws have been created to stop these things, but are they effective enough? Looking at the broader picture of our society where racial injustice continues, the answer is no. Why? Because these laws were created mostly by white people and white supremacy continues to remain in most parts of our lives.

Reaction to the comments of KP- If all lives matter…then we should see and the government must prove it. Show us our bodies hold the same value. There is no excuse for the slaughter. None. The point of Black Lives Matter isn’t to suggest that black lives should be or are more important than all other lives. Instead, it’s simply pointing out that black people’s lives are relatively undervalued in the US and more likely to be ended by police, and the country needs to recognize that inequity to bring an end to it. I agree with KP that we are in a never-ending cycle that our ancestors had to endure but in different forms. All lives do matter, obviously, but it’s one subset of lives, in particular, that’s currently undervalued in America and always has been since the first black person has been brought to the land of America. Great point about James Baldwin who tried to show the country with a terrible history of racism. Being black, and for no other reason, American society has deemed blacks worthless, and set limits to their ambitions. The establishment has placed boundaries on James’ nephew such as what he can do, where he can live, and whom he can marry. There is an important point in his letter that unfortunately even the unknowing are part of this huge apparatus of racism that has created the unequal Society of America which is a part of our reality now. I would like to see us envision a society where we don’t have to protest for racial justice every year because another black person was killed.

Question MD- How much progress have black people in the US made?

Question JM- What it means to be black in the American educational system?

Question MB- If we’re converging on equality anyway, then why do we need laws and other measures to promote it?

-people can not be excepted to follow laws if they don’t understand and the morals behind it.

-minorities in the united states continue to receive discriminatory treatment from and irregularities in the justice system .

-humans should not be valued over property I agree that , us humans are the reason we are all moving, as well as technology with the advance that humans have been able to invest that makes society move on.

-for the past few years has the United States been living in a immune way towards racial injustice ?

– till today can we really say the civil rights act manage to change law against white supremacy?

-can science, law and religion be used in a vulnerable way?

Reaction to the comments of MB- I do agree that Black people have made a lot of progress in different fields but more remains unchanged. The share of African Americans living in poverty has declined substantially, today they are much better educated, material standards have in many ways improved, but many areas never saw much progress, or what progress was made has been halted or even reversed. Americans are determined to believe in black progress but it’s kind of a myth that the government tries to make people believe with the laws that were created to state that “we have equality because we have laws.” Facts show different results. Current gaps in every significant domain of social well-being (jobs, politics, education, health, housing, and of course criminal justice) are the facts that show the difference.

Reaction to the comments of AM- No questions that humanity is more important than money but unfortunately our systems of power value capital over human lives. Too many people in black communities have been killed by taxpayer-funded law enforcement officers. Even more have been harmed physically and psychologically by the over-militarized, over-funded police and sheriff departments. The U.S. tax system, once viewed as a model for sharing the nation’s bounty, is today a new engine of inequality. We should call on elected officials to not prioritize property over human life. Our focus needs to be on human life that is lost without recourse to justice. Every person should be treated equally before the law. It’s central to our country’s values and the rule of law.

Reaction to the comments of SK- To understand today’s protests, we must look further back. The conflicts of today aren’t just a repeat of past troubles, they’re a new development in the American fight for racial equality. The roots of protests go far deeper into the last hundred years of American history, which were punctuated by race riots, massacres, and clashes between the police/legal system of America, and African Americans. I agree with SK that the pattern will continue until systematic racism is rooted out. Racism is still present in our society and history repeats in a different way. Racial injustice reminds black people of their history and they don’t want it to repeat. White supremacy has created the conditions black people are protesting now. It puts black people at risk of losing everything their parents, grandparents, and their grandparents fought to win. Black people built this country – that is an indisputable fact. They have always been central to upholding American ideals, to defeating hate violence, from chattel slavery to the Confederacy to Jim Crow.

Reaction to the comments of JM- Despite African American workers have increased access to jobs and getting more jobs, labor market outcomes—including higher unemployment and fewer good jobs—continue to be worse for African American workers and their families. These differences are not new, and the longest labor market expansion on record has not eliminated them. African Americans have always been more vulnerable in the labor market. They regularly experience higher unemployment rates and work in worse jobs, which feature lower pay and fewer benefits, than whites.  American lawmakers have long sought to secure land for, reduce barriers to, and expand the wealth-building capacity of property ownership and affordable rental housing. But these efforts have almost exclusively benefited white households often, they have removed people of color from their homes, denied them access to wealth-building opportunities, and relocated them to isolated communities. Across the country, historic and ongoing displacement, exclusion, and segregation continue to prevent people of color from obtaining and retaining their own homes and accessing safe, affordable housing. Racial segregation in public education has been illegal for 65 years in the United States. Yet American public schools remain largely separate and unequal with profound consequences for students, especially for blacks. Let’s not forget that the Supreme Court declared racial segregation in schools to be unconstitutional in the landmark 1954 ruling Brown v. Board of Education. Perhaps less well known is the extent to which American schools are still segregated. All these experiences have historically been worse than that for whites, and this continues today. Many laws have been created to stop these things, but are they effective enough? Looking at the broader picture of our society where racial injustice continues, the answer is no. Why? Because these laws were created mostly by white people and white supremacy continues to remain in most parts of our lives.

Reaction to the comments of KP- If all lives matter…then we should see and the government must prove it. Show us our bodies hold the same value. There is no excuse for the slaughter. None. The point of Black Lives Matter isn’t to suggest that black lives should be or are more important than all other lives. Instead, it’s simply pointing out that black people’s lives are relatively undervalued in the US and more likely to be ended by police, and the country needs to recognize that inequity to bring an end to it. I agree with KP that we are in a never-ending cycle that our ancestors had to endure but in different forms. All lives do matter, obviously, but it’s one subset of lives, in particular, that’s currently undervalued in America and always has been since the first black person has been brought to the land of America. Great point about James Baldwin who tried to show the country with a terrible history of racism. Being black, and for no other reason, American society has deemed blacks worthless, and set limits to their ambitions. The establishment has placed boundaries on James’ nephew such as what he can do, where he can live, and whom he can marry. There is an important point in his letter that unfortunately even the unknowing are part of this huge apparatus of racism that has created the unequal Society of America which is a part of our reality now. I would like to see us envision a society where we don’t have to protest for racial justice every year because another black person was killed.

Question MD- How much progress have black people in the US made?

Question JM- What it means to be black in the American educational system?

Question MB- If we’re converging on equality anyway, then why do we need laws and other measures to promote it?

i reacted to the students voices with an open mind and tried to understand what the purpose  black lives matter was and what they fight for in their movement other than equality. as i read their responses i realized that it was more than fighting for equality, it also addresses the injustices in our local, state, and federal governments for not represents minorities enough but also abuse of power in the police department such as police brutality. my question about these comments is do you believe that these “new laws” will actually work or will not be followed through with by the police since every police department is different when it comes  to certain jurisdictions in each state? and another question is how is systemic racism hurting people of color in America?
After reading these students comments, I must say that my perspective has definitely broaden and I was introduced to new ideas that I did not think about. I agree with “KP” when they said “we’re in a never-ending cycle that our ancestors had to endure but just in different forms” I feel the same way and it is just scary to think that this specific cycle has been occurring in many different forms but just the same concept for a countless amount of time. I enjoyed reading the comments of these students but my question to these students would be “How can we fix it?” or even “What can we do to enhance reform and promote equality?”
KP

Blacks have been mistreated for an extended period. I disagree with the supposed opponents of Black Lives Matter. The All Lives Matter tag is not supposed to consider the needs of the entire community. The message is aimed at downplaying the efforts of BLM. Further, I am in agreement that we are in a vicious cycle if the same pattern is going to continue. This type of oppression seems to have a lifeline based on the behavior of a segment of the society that claims ownership to superiority.

AM

You raise valid points on the respect and honor that should be accorded to human life. We should focus on humanity as a virtue instead of thinking of material possessions. The attention given to property should be extended to the value attached to the protection of human life. Fairness is required, but it can only be guaranteed by enlightened leadership. I concur with this statement: there is a need to change the old ways of treating the citizenry.

SK

I agree with your opening statement: the need to trigger a protest to fight injustice. Oppression is not required in the modern-era societal era. Individuals have to fight for what they believe they deserve. You state that a counter-reaction to the Black Lives Matter protest shows the unending pattern of unfairness. It is true that a cessation of systemic racism would be the only way that would end the quest for equality in society.

JM

You start the discourse with a statement justifying the ongoing protests. Several African Americans have indeed been disillusioned by the treatment they receive from others. I also agree with you when you say that slavery and human freedom cannot exist. However, the quest for universal justice should be an unending war.

FC

I agree with when you state that the law has never been fair to African Americans. The existence of legal provisions to fight all manner of injustices does not suffice. I also concur when you state that there have been tremendous changes in some quarters. However, it is shocking that African Americans have to fight against individuals considering themselves superior to them continually.

What is the best way to change all these problems that are facing our community?
very insightful  & the part about the white mans profound desire was very intriguing to recognize the flaws in the system & build one to address the flaws in the old one shows where we as people has changed over time
people are trying to compare black lives matter to all lives matter but meanwhile black lives are the ones being taken away what does it mean when humans should be valued over property?